Pin It

Widgets

Read Online: Implementing Cisco Switched Networks Part3

Implementing Cisco Switched Networks Part 3
Exam Vendor: Cisco
Exam Code: Cisco-642-813
Exam Name: CCNA


Dumps, Free Dumps, VCP5 Dumps| VMware Dumps, VCP Dumps, VCP4 Dumps, VCAP Dumps, VCDX Dumps, Cisco Dumps, CCNA, CCNA640-802, CCNA Dumps, CCNP Dumps, CCIE Dumps, ITIL, Exin Dumps, ITIL Dumps, ITIL3 Dumps, ITIL4 Dumps, ITIL 2012 Dumps, CWNP Dumps, PW0-050, PW0-070, Microsoft, Microsoft Dumps, MCTS Dumps, MCP Dumps, MCSA Dumpe, MCITP Dumps, 70-640, 70-642, 70-643, Oracle, Oracle Dumps, CompTIA, Sun Dumps, RedHat Dumps, Other Dumps, Novell Dumps, Other Dumps, Citrix Dumps, 1Y0-A19, 1Y0-A20 ITIL V3, 

   

-->
   


-->
-->





Exam C
QUESTION 1
Match the Attributes on the left with the types of VLAN designs on right.
Select and Place:



Correct Answer:
Section: Module 2: VLAN, PVLAN, Etherchannel
Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
QUESTION 2
DRAG DROP
Place the local and distributed VLAN functions on the left into the associated boxes on the right.
Select and Place:



Correct Answer:



Section: Module 1: Design
Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
QUESTION 3
You have been tasked with planning a VLAN solution that will connect a server in one buliding to several hosts
in another building. The solution should be built using the local vlan model and layer 3 switching at the
distribution layer. Identify the questions related to this vlan solution that would ask the network administrator
before you start the planning by dragging them into the target zone one the right. Not all questions will be used.



Select and Place:



Correct Answer:



Section: Module 2: VLAN, PVLAN, Etherchannel
Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
In local vlan solition common VTP mode is transparent
CREATE A VLAN BASED IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
Foundation Learning Guide Chapter 2 pg. 58-59
Subnets and associated VLANs
VLAN Number
VLAN Name
VLAN Purpose
VLAN to IP Address Scheme
Physical location of VLANs (determine which switch has which VLANs)
Assignment method (dot1x etc.)
Placement of trunks, native VLAN for trunks, and allowed VLANs on trunks
VTP configuration
Quick Reference Guide Chapter 2 pg. 14
VLAN numbering, naming, and IP addressing scheme



VLAN placement (local or multiple switches)
Trunk requirements
VTP parameters
Test and verification plan
From Foundation Learning Guide
The following steps outline the considerations you need to make with regards to using an SVI:
1) On your L3 switch identify the VLANs that require a default gateway.
2) For any SVI's not already present on your L3 switch you will need to create then. As such you will need to
decide on suitable numbering for the SVI (should be the VLAN ID number) plus an IP address to associate with
it. Don't forget to No Shutdown the interface.
3) To perform L3 routing functions you need to set the L3 switch to be able to perform the routing. To achieve
this use the global command - #ip routing - this will enable to switch to route between your VLANs
4) Define any appropriate dynamic routing protocols. Typically required if you are configuring a larger enterprise
network that may be subject to change. You can deploy RIP, EIGRP, OSPF which ever you feel is appropriate.
5) Finally with the information above gathered consider if you require any given SVI to be excluded from
contributing to the SVI state Up-Down calculation. Do this using the 'Autostate' feature
QUESTION 4
You have a VLAN implementation that requires inter-vlan routing using layer 3 switches. Drag the steps on the
left that should be part of the verification plan to the spaces on the right. Not all choices will be used.
Select and Place:



Correct Answer:



Section: Module 2: VLAN, PVLAN, Etherchannel
Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
QUESTION 5
Categorize the high availability network resource or feature with the management level, network level, or
system level used.



Select and Place:



Correct Answer:



Section: Module 5: HA, Syslog, IP SLA
Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
QUESTION 6
Place the DTP mode with its correct description.



Select and Place:
Correct Answer:



Section: Module 2: VLAN, PVLAN, Etherchannel
Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
1. trunk: This setting places the port in permanent trunking mode. The corresponding switch port at the other
end of the trunk should be similarly configured because negotiation is not allowed. You should also manually
configure the encapsulation mode.
2. dynamic desirable: The port actively attempts to convert the link into trunking mode. If the far-end switch port
is configured to trunk, dynamic desirable, or dynamic auto mode, trunking is successfully negotiated.
3. dynamic auto: The port converts the link into trunking mode. If the far-end switch port is configured to trunk
or dynamic desirable, trunking is negotiated. Because of the passive negotiation behavior, the link never
becomes a trunk if both ends of the link are left to the dynamic auto default.
4. Negotiate: The encapsulation is negotiated to select either ISL or IEEE 802.1Q, whichever is supported by
both ends of the trunk. If both ends support both types, ISL is favored.
5. Access: Puts the interface into access mode that mean interface is in non-trunking mode.
6. Nonegotiate: Forces the port to permanently trunk but not send DTP frames. For use when the DTP frames
confuse the neighboring (non-Cisco) 802.1q switch. You must manually set the neighboring switch to trunking.
QUESTION 7
Drag the port states on the left, to their correct description on the right.



Select and Place:
Correct Answer:



Section: Module 3: STP, RSTP, MSTP
Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
After the bridges have determined which ports are Root Ports, Designated Ports, and non-Designated Ports,
STP is ready to create a loop-free topology. To do this, STP configures Root Ports and Designated Ports to
forward traffic. STP sets non-Designated Ports to block traffic. Although Forwarding and Blocking are the only
two states commonly seen in a stable network, there are actually five STP states. This list can be viewed
hierarchically in that bridge ports start at the Blocking state and work their way up to the Forwarding state. The
Disabled state is the administratively shutdown STP state. It is not part of the normal STP port processing. After
the switch is initialized, ports start in the Blocking state. The Blocking state is the STP state in which a bridge
listens for BPDUs.
A port in the Blocking state does the following:
1. Discards frames received from the attached segment or internally forwarded through switching
2. Receives BPDUs and directs them to the system module
3. Has no address database
4. Does not transmit BPDUs received from the system module
5. Receives and responds to network management messages but does not transmit them If a bridge thinks it is
the Root Bridge immediately after booting or in the absence of BPDUs for a certain period of time, the port
transitions into the Listening state. The Listening state is the STP state in which no user data is being passed,
but the port is sending and receiving BPDUs in an effort to determine the active topology.
A port in the Listening state does the following:
1. Discards frames received from the attached segment or frames switched from another port
2. Has no address database
3. Receives BPDUs and directs them to the system module
4. Processes BPDUs received from the system module (Processing BPDUs is a separate action from receiving
or transmitting BPDUs)
5. Receives and responds to network management messages
It is during the Listening state that the three initial convergence steps take place - elect a Root Bridge, elect


Root Ports, and elect Designated Ports. Ports that lose the Designated Port election become non-Designated
Ports and drop back to the Blocking state. Ports that remain Designated Ports or Root Ports after 15 seconds -
the default Forward Delay STP timer value - progress into the Learning state. The lifetime of the Learning state
is also governed by the Forward Delay timer of 15 seconds, the default setting. The Learning state is the STP
state in which the bridge is not passing user data frames but is building the bridging table and gathering
information, such as the source VLANs of data frames. As the bridge receives a frame, it places the source
MAC address and port into the bridging table. The Learning state reduces the amount of flooding required when
data forwarding begins.
A port in the Learning state does the following:
1. Discards frames received from the attached segment
2. Discards frames switched from another port for forwarding
3. Incorporates station location into its address database
4. Receives BPDUs and directs them to the system module
5. Receives, processes, and transmits BPDUs received from the system module
6. Receives and responds to network management messages
If a port is still a Designated Port or Root Port after the Forward Delay timer expires for the Learning state, the
port transitions into the Forwarding state. The Forwarding state is the STP state in which data traffic is both
sent and received on a port. It is the "last" STP state. At this stage, it finally starts forwarding user data frames.
A port in the Forwarding state does the following:
1. Forwards frames received from the attached segment
2. Forwards frames switched from another port for forwarding
3. Incorporates station location information into its address database
4. Receives BPDUs and directs them to the system module
5. Processes BPDUs received from the system module
6. Receives and responds to network management messages
QUESTION 8
Specifies the kind of messages, by severity level, to be sent to the syslog server.
Select and Place:



Correct Answer:



Section: Module 5: HA, Syslog, IP SLA
Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
http://www.ciscopress.com/articles/article.asp?p=426638&seqNum=3
QUESTION 9
Drag the choices on the left to the boxes on the right that should be included when creating a VLAN-based
implementation plan.
Not all choices will be used.



Select and Place:
Correct Answer:



Section: Module 2: VLAN, PVLAN, Etherchannel
Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
QUESTION 10
Drag snmp versions and associated features
Select and Place:



Correct Answer:



Section: Module 5: HA, Syslog, IP SLA
Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
QUESTION 11
Drag HSRP states
Select and Place:



Correct Answer:



Section: Module 6: HSRP, VRRP, GLBP
Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
HSRP defines six states in which an HSRP-enabled router can exist:
1. Initial - This is the state from which the routers begin the HSRP process. This state indicates that HSRP is
not running. It is entered via a configuration change or when an interface first comes up.
2. Learn - The router has not determined the virtual IP address, and has not yet seen an authenticated hello
message from the active router. In this state the router is still waiting to hear from the active router.
3. Listen - The router knows the virtual IP address, but is neither the active router nor the standby router. It
listens for hello messages from those routers. Routers other than the active and standby router remain in the
listen state.
4. Speak - The router sends periodic hello messages and is actively participating in the election of the active or
standby router. A router cannot enter Speak state unless it has the virtual IP address.
5. Standby - The router is a candidate to become the next active router and sends periodic hello messages.
Excluding transient conditions, there must be at most one router in the group in Standby state.
6. Active - The router is currently forwarding packets that are sent to the group virtual MAC address. The router
sends periodic hello messages. Excluding transient conditions, there must be at most one router in Active state
in the HSRP group.
QUESTION 12
Drag and Drop
Local VLAN's vs End-To-END VLANS
Select and Place:



Correct Answer:



Section: Module 2: VLAN, PVLAN, Etherchannel
Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
QUESTION 13
Drag & Drop



Select and Place:



Correct Answer:



Section: Module 8: VoIP, QoS
Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
QUESTION 14



Select and Place:



Correct Answer:



Section: Module 2: VLAN, PVLAN, Etherchannel
Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
QUESTION 15



Select and Place:



Correct Answer:



Section: Module 1: Design
Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
QUESTION 16



Select and Place:
Correct Answer:



Section: Module 9: Wireless LAN
Explanation
Explanation/Reference:
QUESTION 17
Wireless LWAPP Association and Discovery Process
Drag & Drop
Note not all options are used



Select and Place:



Correct Answer:



Section: Module 9: Wireless LAN
Explanation



Explanation/Reference:
This is the correct answer:
(1. The IP address is statically configured on the lightweigh AP.)
2. The lightweight AP requests an IP address via DHCP
3. The lightweight AP searches for a wireless LAN controller using LWAPP in Layer 2 mode.
4. The lightweight AP sends a LWAPP Discovery Request to the management IP address of the wireless LAN
controller via broadcast
5. The wireless LAN controller responds with a Discovery Response from the Manager IP address.
6. The lightweight AP chooses the AP Manager with the least number of associated access points and sends
the join request.
==========================================================================
From Cisco:
Register the LAP with the WLC:
This sequence of events must occur in order for an LAP to register to a WLC:
1.The LAPs issue a DHCP discovery request to get an IP address, unless it has previously had a static IP
address configured.
2.The LAP sends LWAPP discovery request messages to the WLCs.
3.Any WLC that receives the LWAPP discovery request responds with an LWAPP discovery response
message.
4.From the LWAPP discovery responses that the LAP receives, the LAP selects a WLC to join.
5.The LAP then sends an LWAPP join request to the WLC and expects an LWAPP join response.
6.The WLC validates the LAP and then sends an LWAPP join response to the LAP.
7.The LAP validates the WLC, which completes the discovery and join process. The LWAPP join process
includes mutual authentication and encryption key derivation, which is used to secure the join process and
future LWAPP control messages.
8.The LAP registers with the controller.
The first problem that the LAP faces is how to determine where to send the LWAPP discovery requests (step
2). The LAP uses a hunting procedure and a discovery algorithm in order to determine the list of WLCs to which
the LAP can send the discovery request messages.
This procedure describes the hunting process:
1.The LAP issues a DHCP request to a DHCP server in order to get an IP address, unless an assignment was
made previously with a static IP address.
2.If Layer 2 LWAPP mode is supported on the LAP, the LAP broadcasts an LWAPP discovery message in a
Layer 2 LWAPP frame. Any WLC that is connected to the network and that is configured for Layer 2 LWAPP
mode responds with a Layer 2 discovery response. If the LAP does not support Layer 2 mode, or if the WLC or
the LAP fails to receive an LWAPP discovery response to the Layer 2 LWAPP discovery message broadcast,
the LAP proceeds to step 3.
3.If step 1 fails, or if the LAP or the WLC does not support Layer 2 LWAPP mode, the LAP attempts a Layer 3
LWAPP WLC discovery.
See the Layer 3 LWAPP WLC Discovery Algorithm section of this document.


4.If step 3 fails, the LAP resets and returns to step 1.
Note: If you want to specify an IP address for an access point instead of having one assigned automatically by a
DHCP server, you can use the controller GUI or CLI to configure a static IP address for the access point. Refer
to the Configuring a Static IP Address on a Lightweight Access Point section of the WLC Configuration guide
for more information. If the LAP is assigned a static IP address and can not reach the WLC, it falls back to
DHCP.
Source: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk722/tk809/technologies_tech_note09186a00806c9e51.shtml


-->